Categories
Infographics Web Security

An Inforgraphic: How to Keep Your Internet Usage Private

It is no secret that our Internet activity is anything but private. Email, chats, videos, photos, file transfers, social networking details, and more can all be accessed at any given time.

In fact, today’s internet giants are known to make our data available: AOL, Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, and others have been reported to monitor our usage.

Alternatively, there are service provides and tools that claim to keep your information and usage data private. WhoIsHostingThis.com, a web hosting comparison site, lists some in the infographic below:

9 Tips for Keeping Your Internet Usage Private [Infographic] by Who Is Hosting This: The Blog

Categories
Infographics New Products News Technology Web Security

An Infographic: Magic Lantern, a Keystroke Logging Software Developed by the FBI

Magic Lantern is keystroke logging software developed by the United States’ Federal Bureau of Investigation. Variously described as a virus and a Trojan horse, it can be installed remotely, via an e-mail attachment or by exploiting common operating system vulnerabilities. It’s unclear whether Magic Lantern would transmit keystrokes it records back to the FBI over the Internet or store the information to be seized later in a raid.

The FBI intends to deploy Magic Lantern in the form of an e-mail attachment. When the attachment is opened, it installs a trojan horse on the suspect’s computer. The trojan horse is activated when the suspect uses PGP encryption, often used to increase the security of sent e-mail messages. When activated, the trojan horse will log the PGP password, which allows the FBI to decrypt user communications.

Magic Lantern could be installed over the Internet by tricking a person into double-clicking an e-mail attachment or by exploiting some of the same weaknesses in popular commercial software that allow hackers to break into computers.

Co-operation by Antivirus Vendors

Magic Lantern was first reported in a column by Bob Sullivan of MSNBC on 20 November 2001 and by Ted Bridis of the Associated Press.

Bridis reported that Network Associates (maker of McAfee anti-virus products), had contacted the FBI following the press reports about Magic Lantern to ensure their anti-virus software would not detect the program. While Network Associates issued a denial, the public disclosure of the existence of Magic Lantern sparked a debate as to whether anti-virus companies could or should detect the FBI’s keystroke logger.

This infographic by MobiStealth looks at how the Magic Lantern progressed over time, and precisely what the rootkit can help steal from a target’s system: