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Google to stop showing more than two listings from same site in top results

Google is making some significant changes to its search engine algorithm where users see multiple listings on the search results page from the same website. Now, the Google wouldn’t show more than two listings from the same site in top results.

In a tweet through Google Search Liasion, the tech giant mentioned, “Have you already done a search and gotten many links all from the same site in the top results? We’ve heard your feedback about this and wanting more variety. A new change now launching in Google Search is designed to provide more diversity of our results.”

The company also added that it will show more than two results from same site in cases where the search engine algorithms determine that the results are specifically relevant for the particular search.

Currently, Google fetches results from websites considering the subdomains and root domains different. This means that the subdomains are treated as separate websites. Now, with the changes, the subdomains will be treated as a part of the root domains.

For instance, your subdomain like user.yourwebsite.com and your root domain – www.yourwebsite.com will be considered from the same single site and counted towards two results.

Finally, the site diversity launch is separate from the June 2019 Core Update that began this week. These are two different, unconnected releases.”

The change is still rolling out and Google is working on it for improvements.

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Infographics

Google: The story behind Internet’s Giant

Today Google is the most respected and influential name in the digital world. It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that it is the unchallenged ruler of the internet kingdom. However, like any other brand, Google too has an interesting story behind its formation.

It started out as a research project

During 1996, two university students started a research project. At that time the duo, i.e., Larry Page and Sergey Brin, didn’t know that they have taken the baby steps towards building the digital world’s largest company. Page was considering exploring the WWW’s mathematical properties looking at the things with unique perspective. Larry focused on the connection between number/nature of backlinks and the specific web page to which it was associated. Soon Brin joined Page in the research project.

Modest functioning and meagre resources

Google started out on a very humble note and during its initial stage, it could not process more than 50 pages. For storing their limited data just 10 hard drives of 4 GB were sufficient that is just a fraction of the resources Google uses today for a massive 100 million GB! However, it seems that Larry and Sergey already had something great in mind as they used the Lego Design for supporting the future scalability.

A massive leap to the success

Due to the innovative concept and the constant efforts, the company progressed by leaps and bounds. Sergey and Page definitely didn’t anticipate the massive potential of the company but it seems that they had some inkling. That’s why they approached the digital Giant of that time- Yahoo! for selling Google. However, Yahoo didn’t seem to be convinced about the business viability of this young project that is why it declined the offer. It took them some time to realize the Google’s worth and they again called the company expressing their interest to buy it. It seems that they had “really” understood the worth of the company and were ready to pay a massive amount of $3 Billion! Was the amount really massive, for Google! Perhaps no! That’s why Google refused the offer.

The following infographic will take you on a quick tour around Google’s journey towards becoming an Internet giant. Take a look.

About Guest Author:

Mark Andrew is a web developer with varied interests- travel, wildlife, history, art, and of course technology! He is a keen supporter of free internet and when not in the cabin, he loves to spend his time outdoors exploring the world, people and technology.

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News Technology

Facebook’s new ‘Privacy Aware’ Graph Search feature: All That You Need to Know

After largely ignoring that little white box at the top of its interface for years, Facebook is finally getting serious about search. The company announced today a new experience that it’s calling Facebook Graph Search. Available as a “beta” or early version now – it will initially let users browse mainly photographs, people, places and members’ interests. It relies heavily on “Likes” and other connections to determine what to show as the most relevant search results for each user. It also offers what you might think of as search filters — the ability to search based on the vast user data that Facebook has in its system (or “graph,” as they like to say).

“Graph search is not Web search,” said Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder and CEO. Zuckerberg pointed out that a Web search with the query “hip-hop” will present links about hip-hop; Facebook’s graph search, on the other hand, can answer a query like “Which of my friends live in San Francisco?”

Zuckerberg described “people, photos, places, and interests” as four potential search dimensions for graph search. Zuckerberg used the intersections of these areas to see Mexican restaurants his friends had been to in the Palo Alto area, as well as to find the best-liked photo of him and his wife in order to decide which one to use on a Christmas card. Graph search queries use phrases rather than keywords: “Friends who like Star Wars and Harry Potter” was one example.

People: “friends who live in my city,” “people from my hometown who like hiking,” “friends of friends who have been to Yosemite National Park,” “software engineers who live in San Francisco and like skiing,” “people who like things I like,” “people who like tennis and live nearby”

Photos: “photos I like,” “photos of my family,” “photos of my friends before 1999,” “photos of my friends taken in New York,” “photos of the Eiffel Tower”

Places: “restaurants in San Francisco,” “cities visited by my family,” “Indian restaurants liked by my friends from India,” “tourist attractions in Italy visited by my friends,” “restaurants in New York liked by chefs,” “countries my friends have visited”

Interests: “music my friends like,” “movies liked by people who like movies I like,” “languages my friends speak,” “strategy games played by friends of my friends,” “movies liked by people who are film directors,” “books read by CEOs”

When Facebook first launched, the main way most people used the site was to browse around, learn about people and make new connections. Graph Search takes us back to our roots and allows people to use the graph to make new connections.
– Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder and CEO.

Facebook stressed that users can only search content that has been shared with them—for instance, if it’s not in your profile that you watch Game of Thrones or you never check into the Mexican restaurants you frequent, you’ll never appear in those searches. However, if a friend checks you into a Mexican restaurant you attend with them and makes that post public, that will likely feed into any graph searches your friends do. Likewise, it appears that any post that is public (i.e., technically shared with every Facebook user) can be involved in a query made by any user, regardless of their degree of direct social involvement with you.

What About Challenging Google & Other Search Engines?
Facebook isn’t launching a traditional search engine like Google or Bing is — this is a social search engine, and possibly the one most likely to succeed due to Facebook’s billion-plus user base and the vast amounts of data that users put into Facebook.The big question for the long haul is whether or not Facebook Graph Search is good enough that users will change their search activity enough to put a dent in “the Google habit.” Although Facebook is saying that its new search product offers a different use-case than traditional web search, anything that keeps users on Facebook longer and away from Google would be a win in Facebook’s view.It’s also worth noting that Facebook has, as you’d expect, tapped Bing to provide web-based search results when needed to help fill with content that Facebook can’t find within its own walls.

Graph Search FAQ:
Here is what the new feature is all about, and how users can use it:

– What is Graph Search?
Graph Search is a new way for you to find people, photos, places and interests that are most relevant to you on Facebook.

– What is Graph Search useful for?
Graph Search will help you instantly find others, learn more about them and make connections, explore photos, quickly find places like local attractions and restaurants, and learn about common interests like music, movies, books and more. All results are unique based on the strength of relationships and connections.

– What can I search for?
With Graph Search, you can search for people, photos, places and interests.

– How do I search?
Type your search into the blue bar at the top of the page. As you start to type, suggestions appear in a drop down. You can refine your search using the tools on the right-hand side of the page.

Some example searches include:
– People who like tennis and live nearby
– Photos before 1990
– Photos of my friends in New York
– Sushi restaurants in Palo Alto my friends have liked
– Tourist attractions in Italy visited by my friends

– How are you rolling this out?
Graph Search is in a limited preview, or beta. That means Graph Search will only be available to a very small number of people who use Facebook in US English.

– How can I get Facebook Graph Search?
You can sign up for the waitlist at www.facebook.com/graphsearch

– Does Graph Search change any of my current privacy settings?
No. Graph Search follows your current privacy settings. You can only search for content that has been shared with you.

– How do I control what tags, locations and photos can show up about me?
To control tags, photos or posts with locations about you that appear in search, go to your Activity Log.

Users can go to www.facebook.com/graphsearch to get on the waitlist. The roll out is going to be slow so the company can see how people use Graph Search and make improvements. If you’ve any more questions, please feel free to use the Comments section.